[{"id":8,"name":"Shelley Cohn","firstName":"Shelley","lastName":"Cohn","title":"","type":"Technical/Cultural Advisory Committee","cms":"judges_g2","image":"image/judges/cohn_shelley.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/cohn_shelley.jpg","shortDescription":"Retired, Executive Director, Arizona Commission on the Arts","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Shelley Cohn currently serves as board chair of the Arizona Community Foundation and president of the board of the Desert Botanical Garden. She provides consulting work on arts issues for The Flinn Foundation. 

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Shelley Cohn retired in October 2005 as the Executive Director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts, having served in that capacity since 1984. She was involved in seeing the appropriation of the Arts Commission grow from 14 cents per capita to 80 cents per capita and in developing special funding initiatives including the Arizona Arts Trust Fund and Arizona ArtShare, the Arizona arts endowment fund. She oversaw the creation of programs that supported artists and arts organizations to connect with their communities in effective and meaningful ways. 

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After retirement she served one year as the interim CEO of the Scottsdale Cultural Council overseeing the work of the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art and the Scottsdale Public Art.

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She has taught classes in arts entrepreneurship and arts and public policy for ASU.

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She has served on other boards including Childsplay, ASU Hillel, where she chaired the Life & Legacy program of the Jewish Community Foundation and Jewish Federation of Phoenix. 

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She has explored new adventures including desert landscaping school at the Desert Botanical Garden, the Melton Program for continuing Jewish education, teaching, consulting work and yoga.

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She holds a masters degree in Humanities from Arizona State University and an undergraduate degree in English from Washington University and Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government, Program for Senior Executives in State & Local Government.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"As ACF develops strategies to invest funds from the newly established Newton and Betty Rosenzweig Endowment for the Arts, it is exciting to see an art prize connected to water as one of the very first initiatives to be supported.\"","quote":"\"As ACF develops strategies to invest funds from the newly established Newton and Betty Rosenzweig Endowment for the Arts, it is exciting to see an art prize connected to water as one of the very first initiatives to be supported.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":9,"name":"Elisa de la Vara","firstName":"Elisa","lastName":"de la Vara","title":"","type":"Technical/Cultural Advisory Committee","cms":"judges_g2","image":"image/judges/delavara_elisa.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/delavara_elisa.jpg","shortDescription":"Chief Community Officer, Arizona Community Foundation","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Elisa de la Vara is Chief Community Officer for the Arizona Community Foundation. She oversees the Foundation’s engagements and relationships with Arizona’s diverse communities. She is responsible for the grants management division, all major community initiatives including the Community Impact Loan Fund, affordable housing fund, immigration and border philanthropy, and Philanthropy for All initiatives. Elisa is also responsible for ACF’s statewide Affiliate system, including regional staff members in Cochise, Flagstaff, Sedona, Yavapai County and Yuma. 

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When Elisa joined ACF as Senior Director of Philanthropic Services - Community Initiatives in 2015, she brought four decades of experience in community development and in the nonprofit, government and commercial sectors, most recently having managed the daily operations of Congressman Pastor’s District 7 Office for seven years until the Congressman’s retirement. Elisa’s experience in the private sector includes positions with Enterprise 2000, Inc. and Espinoza Development Corporation, both real estate and property development companies. She has held significant civic leadership roles throughout Arizona, including serving as Special Assistant to Arizona Governor Bruce Babbitt from 1983 to 1986 and later, as Comptroller for Gov. Babbitt’s 1988 national presidential campaign. She rose through the ranks at the nonprofit Chicanos Por La Causa from 1975 to 1983, ultimately serving as Executive Vice President.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"Honoring the rich diversity within our state and the talent of local artists, the Water Public Art Challenge will showcase the rich cultural history that led to the Valley of the Sun's current status as the largest city in the Sonoran Desert region.\"","quote":"\"Honoring the rich diversity within our state and the talent of local artists, the Water Public Art Challenge will showcase the rich cultural history that led to the Valley of the Sun's current status as the largest city in the Sonoran Desert region.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":10,"name":"Jim Enote","firstName":"Jim","lastName":"Enote","title":"","type":"Technical/Cultural Advisory Committee","cms":"judges_g2","image":"image/judges/enote_jim.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/enote_jim.jpg","shortDescription":"Chief Executive Officer, Colorado Plateau Foundation","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Jim is a Zuni tribal member and CEO of the Colorado Plateau Foundation. He serves on the boards of the Trust for Mutual Understanding, Grand Canyon Trust, and formally with the Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation. He is a senior advisor for Mountain Cultures at the Mountain Institute, a National Geographic Society Explorer, a New Mexico Community Luminaria, and an E.F. Schumacher Society Fellow. Jim’s service the past forty years includes natural resource, cultural resource, philanthropic, and arts assignments for many organizations including UNESCO, UNDP, International Secretariat for Water, Nordic Council of Ministers, Tibet Child Nutrition Project, the Mountain Institute, National Geographic Society, US Bureau of Indian Affairs, US National Park Service, Zuni Tribe, and several major charitable foundations, museums, and universities. He has written in Heritage In the Context of Globalization; Science, Technology, and Human Values; Sacredness as a Means to Conservation; Mapping Our Places; Indigenous People and Sustainable Development; A:shiwi A:wan Ulohnanne, and Redrock Stories, to name a few. Recent short pieces include; We Cannot Live by Sentiments Alone, The Museum Collaboration Manifesto, Buyer Beware, What I Tell Boys, and Please Don’t Call Me a Warrior. In 2010 while serving as the director of the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and during the American Anthropological Association’s annual conference Jim was awarded the first Ames Prize for Innovative Museum Anthropology. In 2013 he received the Guardian of Culture and Lifeways Award from the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums, and in 2016 received the Hewett Award for leadership and service to the New Mexico museum community and for achievements in the museum field. He lives in his work in-progress home at Zuni, New Mexico.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"The Arizona Water Public Art Challenge is a perfect way to reaffirm that we know water is life and that art makes life worth living.\"","quote":"\"The Arizona Water Public Art Challenge is a perfect way to reaffirm that we know water is life and that art makes life worth living.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":11,"name":"Leah Harrison","firstName":"Leah","lastName":"Harrison","title":"","type":"Technical/Cultural Advisory Committee","cms":"judges_g3","image":"image/judges/harrison_leah.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/harrison_leah.jpg","shortDescription":"Senior Historical Analyst, Salt River Project","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Leah Harrison is a Senior Historical Analyst with Salt River Project’s Research Archives. A native Phoenician and former secondary history educator, Leah earned her Bachelor’s in History Education from the University of Arizona, and her Master’s Degree in Public History and a certificate in Scholarly Publishing from Arizona State University. As a historian with SRP, she analyzes the history of water and power in the valley.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"The challenge is a wonderful opportunity to highlight the long history of irrigation in the Valley and honor the connection between today’s system and the remarkable accomplishments of the Hohokam.\"","quote":"\"The challenge is a wonderful opportunity to highlight the long history of irrigation in the Valley and honor the connection between today’s system and the remarkable accomplishments of the Hohokam.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":4,"name":"Steve J.W. Heeley","firstName":"Steve J.W.","lastName":"Heeley","title":"","type":"Technical/Cultural Advisory Committee","cms":"judges_g2","image":"image/judges/heeley_steven.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/heeley_steven.jpg","shortDescription":"Advisor, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Steve serves as a consultant to Akin Gump. He advises Indian tribes on corporate, transactional and natural resources matters, as well as on tribal governance and jurisdictional issues. He has served as the deputy general counsel for the Gila River Indian Community for over 10 years. In addition, he has served as an adjunct law professor at Arizona State University, teaching seminars on economic development in Indian Country and tribal law and government. He also served as a member of the University’s Advisory Committee for the Indian Law Program for over 10 years.

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During the 104th Congress, he served as staff director and chief counsel to the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, which was chaired by Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. Prior to assuming that role, Steve was counsel to the Subcommittee on Native American Affairs of the Committee on Natural Resources in the U.S. House of Representatives, which was established in 1993. Prior to the creation of this subcommittee, he served as the Deputy Counsel on Indian affairs to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs under Chairman George Miller. From 1989 to 1991, he was Deputy Minority Counsel to Sen. McCain on the Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs and prior to that he was an attorney for the Gila River Indian Community.   

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With nearly three decades of experience in Indian law, Steve has negotiated a lease agreement and the related documents necessary for the development of a 360,000 square foot retail development on tribal trust lands; tax-exempt financing pursuant to an award under the Tribal Economic Development Bond program to finance the construction of a three star hotel and related facilities on tribal trust lands; the development and construction of a three star casino hotel and related facilities; the development and construction of a four star casino hotel on trust lands; the development and construction of a 500 room four star resort hotel and spa; and a number of management and license agreements covering resort hotels, business hotels, golf courses, retail businesses, and themed entertainment venues.

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Steve is a Potawatomi Indian and a citizen of the Walpole Island First Nation in Ontario, Canada.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"The Water Public Art Challenge provides a terrific opportunity to inspire and educate our fellow Arizonans on the historic and cultural importance of this critical resource.\"","quote":"“Native people have lived and farmed along the Gila and Salt Rivers since time immemorial. These rivers were central to the way of life of the Akimel O’odham and Pee Posh peoples supporting their social structure, economy, and cultural and spiritual existence. The Water Public Art Challenge provides a terrific opportunity to inspire and educate our fellow Arizonans on the historic and cultural importance of this critical resource.”","location":"Singapore","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":12,"name":"Patricia K. Hibbeler","firstName":"Patricia K.","lastName":"Hibbeler","title":"","type":"Technical/Cultural Advisory Committee","cms":"judges_g2","image":"image/judges/hibbeler_patti.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/hibbeler_patti.jpg","shortDescription":"Chief Executive Officer, Phoenix Indian Center","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n
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Patricia K. Hibbeler, ABD, MA is the Chief Executive Officer of the Phoenix Indian Center, Inc., an organization with a 70-year history and the first urban based Indian Center in the Nation. Previously, Ms. Hibbeler was the Field Research Director of a NIDA funded grant entitled the American Indian Multi-sector Health Inventory (AIM-HI) study initiated by Washington University. Prior to her work with the AIM-HI Project, Ms. Hibbeler was the assistant director of the Arizona Prevention Resource Center at ASU and Drug Free Schools Coordinator for the Nebraska Department of Education. In each position, she was successful in building relationships between tribal and urban communities, and state or local agencies focusing on creating collaborations to authentic dialogue and create plans of action to address the health and education issues of American Indian people.

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\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"This prize is important to our community as water is life–life for every living thing. We are all related and together we can find a way toward preservation of water for our future generations.\"","quote":"\"This prize is important to our community as water is life–life for every living thing. We are all related and together we can find a way toward preservation of water for our future generations.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":13,"name":"David Martinez","firstName":"David","lastName":"Martinez","title":"","type":"Technical/Cultural Advisory Committee","cms":"judges_g2","image":"image/judges/martinez_david.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/martinez_david.jpg","shortDescription":"Associate Professor, American Indian Studies, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Arizona State University","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

David Martinez (Akimel O'odham, Hia Ced O'odham, Mexican) is the author of Dakota Philosopher: Charles Eastman and American Indian Thought (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2009) and editor of The American Indian Intellectual Tradition: An Anthology of Writings from 1772 to 1972 (Cornell University Press, 2011). He has also published articles in the American Indian Quarterly, the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, Studies in American Indian Literatures, and Journal of the Southwest. His areas of concentration are American Indian intellectual and political history, contemporary American Indian art and aesthetics, and O'odham culture and history. Currently, he is a co-PI for the NEH funded project, 'Digital Archives of Huhugam Archaeology' (DAHA), in collaboration with the Archaeology program (SHESC) and the Center for Digital Antiquities (tDAR). Also, he recently completed a book on Standing Rock Sioux activist-intellectual Vine Deloria Jr titled Life of the Indigenous Mind: Vine Deloria Jr and the Birth of the Red Power Movement, which will be published by the University of Nebraska Press during Spring 2019.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"I appreciate the regard for the Hohokam that is an integral part of this effort. I hope to do my part in creating more awareness, both in the Phoenix Valley and across the state, about the Huhugam--and O'odham--heritage of this region.\"","quote":"\"I appreciate the regard for the Hohokam that is an integral part of this effort. I hope to do my part in creating more awareness, both in the Phoenix Valley and across the state, about the Huhugam--and O'odham--heritage of this region.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":15,"name":"David M. Roche","firstName":"David M.","lastName":"Roche","title":"","type":"Technical/Cultural Advisory Committee","cms":"judges_g2","image":"image/judges/roche_david.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/roche_david.jpg","shortDescription":"Dickey Family Director and CEO, The Heard Museum","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n
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David M. Roche is the Dickey Family Director and CEO of the Heard Museum. He holds a B.A. from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign and Master of Arts Administration from New York University. He spent eighteen years as the Director of the American Indian art department at Sotheby’s in New York City and has consulted to and lectured at museums and universities around the world including: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the British Museum, The Menil Collection, the Denver Art Museum, and The Andy Warhol Museum. Mr. Roche has been extensively published, most recently in the exhibition catalogues for the Museum of Art and Design’s Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation and the Heard Museum’s Beauty Speaks for Us and Of God and Mortal Men.

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\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"The Water Public Art Challenge places a premium on two precious commodities that are essential to the quality of life in Phoenix, water and art, and is emblematic of our community’s values and leadership in conservation and culture.\"","quote":"\"The Water Public Art Challenge places a premium on two precious commodities that are essential to the quality of life in Phoenix, water and art, and is emblematic of our community’s values and leadership in conservation and culture.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":5,"name":"Phil Boas","firstName":"Phil","lastName":"Boas","title":"","type":"Selection Committee","cms":"judges_g3","image":"image/judges/boas_phil.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/boas_phil.jpg","shortDescription":"Editor of the Editorial Pages of The Arizona Republic","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

As director of the newspaper’s Community Leadership department, he oversees the editorial board and manages the institutional voice of the newspaper. Before that, he was editor of The Republic’s Sunday Viewpoints section and editor of its Community editorial pages. Earlier in his career he was metro editor at The East Valley Tribune and a reporter at the Los Angeles Daily News. He is a graduate of Brigham Young University and is married with four children. He and his family live in Gilbert, Arizona.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"The Hohokam People cultivated 250,000 acres of this Valley with complex irrigation systems that could not have operated without sophisticated design, management and cooperation. The Hohokam are not our allegory of impending doom. They're our inspiration for a long and productive future.\"","quote":"\"Her critics have said Phoenix is an unsustainable city that fittingly sits atop the ruins of an earlier desert civilization. That civilization was the Hohokam people. They cultivated 250,000 acres of this Valley with complex irrigation systems that could not have operated without sophisticated design, management and cooperation. Their civilization endured more than 1,000 years. By contrast, classical Rome lasted half of that. The Hohokam are not our allegory of impending doom. They're our inspiration for a long and productive future.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":6,"name":"Mark B. Bonsall","firstName":"Mark B.","lastName":"Bonsall","title":"","type":"Selection Committee","cms":"judges_g3","image":"image/judges/bonsall_mark.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/bonsall_mark.jpg","shortDescription":"Chief Executive Officer & General Manager, Salt River Project","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Mark B. Bonsall was named SRP’s CEO and General Manager in April 2011. Based in Tempe, Arizona, SRP is one of the nation's largest publicly owned electric and water utilities. Since joining SRP in 1977, Bonsall has served in a variety of positions including Treasurer, and Chief Financial Executive.  

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Bonsall has had the privilege to serve as Board Chair of many wonderful Arizona organizations over the past 40 years. Those include the Phoenix Metro YMCA, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, and the Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Bonsall is currently a member and past chair of the Board of Trustees for the Heard Museum, a Board member for the Greater Phoenix Leadership, and he recently joined the Boards of the Arizona Commerce Authority, and the Arizona Community Foundation.

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As a utility industry executive and leader, Bonsall served on the Task Force on Electric System Reliability, by invitation of the Secretary of Energy. He was a board member and Chairman of the Western Systems Coordinating Council, served on the Issuer Advisory Board of the Municipal Securities Rules Making Board, and the Board of Trustees of the North American Electric Reliability Council. Bonsall currently serves on the Board of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and is immediate past Chair of the Large Public Power Council (LPPC). 

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Bonsall earned his baccalaureate degree in engineering from Arizona State University. He earned a Master of Business Administration degree from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.  Born in Phoenix in 1952, Bonsall and his wife Mary have three children: Benjamin (Rocio), Jonathan, and Molly (Will), and one grandchild, William.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"I'm thrilled to participate in such an impactful public art project. What a wonderful connection it makes to water, community, and education in the State of Arizona.\"","quote":"\"I'm thrilled to participate in such an impactful public art project. What a wonderful connection it makes to water, community, and education in the State of Arizona.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":7,"name":"Robert Booker","firstName":"Robert","lastName":"Booker","title":"","type":"Selection Committee","cms":"judges_g3","image":"image/judges/booker_bob.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/booker_bob.jpg","shortDescription":"Retired, Executive Director, Arizona Commission on the Arts","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Robert Booker recently retired from his position as Executive Director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts. Before accepting the position in Arizona in 2006, he served as the Executive Director of the Minnesota State Arts Board, Prior to his State Arts Council work; he worked for the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and the South Dakota Arts Council.

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He has served as President of the board of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA), Chairman of Grantmakers in the Arts a national association of arts funders, as a trustee for the Western States Arts Federation and Arts Midwest, the Minnesota Museum Educators Association, Arts over Aids and the Minnesota AIDS Project.  

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In addition, Booker served as the Co Chairman of the Arts Committee for the Arizona Mexico Commission and as a member of the Advisory Committee for the Center for LGBTQ Philanthropy at the Arizona Community Foundation. 

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"Artists are truth-tellers, information providers and interpreters of the world around us. An Artist’s response to the Water Public Art Challenge will provide vision and inquiry in a thoughtful and creative manner.\"","quote":"\"Artists are truth-tellers, information providers and interpreters of the world around us. An Artist’s response to the Water Public Art Challenge will provide vision and inquiry in a thoughtful and creative manner.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":2,"name":"Maria Dadgar","firstName":"Maria","lastName":"Dadgar","title":"","type":"Selection Committee","cms":"judges_g3","image":"image/judges/dadgar_maria.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/dadgar_maria.jpg","shortDescription":"Executive Director, Inter Tribal Council of Arizona","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Maria Dadgar is an enrolled member of the Piscataway Tribe of Accokeek, Maryland. Maria has worked in the fields of Higher Education, Non-Profit Executive Management and Tribal Economic Development for more than 18 years. Throughout her career, Maria has been involved in advocating for public policies and legislation on behalf of tribal nations regarding Economic Development, Health Policy and American Indian Education. Currently, Maria holds the position as Executive Director of the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona which serves 21 member tribal nations by leveraging state and federal resources on their behalf.

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Previous positions include: Program Manager for American Indian Studies at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; Executive Director of Atlatl National Native Arts Network, Phoenix, AZ; National Program Manager for the Kaiser Family Foundation American Indian Health Policy Fellowship at First Nations Development Institute; and Acting President/CEO of the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development in Mesa, AZ. Maria launched her career in non-profit management as Co-Founder/National Program Coordinator of Washington Internships for Native Students (WINS) at American University in Washington, D.C. During the 1990s and under Maria’s direction, WINS was selected as one of “America’s Best Practices,” by President Clinton’s Race Relations Commission for outstanding educational/work experience opportunity for American Indian college students. In addition to working at American University, Maria volunteered with the Clinton/Gore Re-election Team in the Office of Public Liaison, the Native American Desk at the DNC, Native Vote 96 as well as, the 1996 Presidential Inaugural Committee.

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Maria holds an Associate’s Degree in Journalism/Mass Communications from Prince George’s Community College in Largo, MD, a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree from American University in Washington, D.C., and a MBA from Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, Arizona. Among several organizations, Maria serves as Secretary of the Board of Directors for the Miracle House Foundation at Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community and is an active member of the Delta Mu Delta International Honor Society in Business, Grand Canyon University Chapter.

\n\n\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"Arizona is the legacy of its Tribal peoples’ ingenuity–it is my honor to serve as a judge for the Water Public Art Challenge and highlight the importance of an environmentally sustainable Arizona for us all.\"","quote":"“Tribal people were the first irrigators within this land that we now refer to as Arizona. Through their resourcefulness, they created the largest single body of irrigated land within prehistoric North America and perhaps the world. Arizona is the legacy of their ingenuity–it is my honor to serve as a judge for the Water Public Art Challenge and highlight the importance of an environmentally sustainable Arizona for us all.”","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":14,"name":"Jacob Moore","firstName":"Jacob","lastName":"Moore","title":"","type":"Selection Committee","cms":"judges_g3","image":"image/judges/moore_jacob.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/moore_jacob.jpg","shortDescription":"AVP, Tribal Relations, Office of University Affairs, Arizona State University","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Mr. Moore is responsible for the intergovernmental affairs between ASU and tribal nations and communities.

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Previously, Jacob Moore was managing partner for Generation Seven Strategic Partners, LLC, and also worked as an Economic Development Analyst and Special Assistant on Congressional and Legislative for the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

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Jacob previously served as a member of the Arizona State Board of Education. Mr. Moore is currently on the board of directors for the Arizona Community Foundation, the ASU Morrison Institute, WestEd, the Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center (AMEPAC), and Touchstone Behavioral Health.

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Mr. Moore earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Finance and an Executive MBA from the Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey College of Business and is an enrolled member of the Tohono O’odham Nation.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"This prize is a great opportunity for us to creatively honor the essential and sacred role that water plays in relationship to our ancestral past, our contemporary present, and our children’s future.”","quote":"\"This prize is a great opportunity for us to creatively honor the essential and sacred role that water plays in relationship to our ancestral past, our contemporary present, and our children’s future.”","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":1,"name":"Steven G. Seleznow","firstName":"Steven G.","lastName":"Seleznow","title":"","type":"Selection Committee","cms":"judges_g3","image":"image/judges/seleznow_steven.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/seleznow_steven.jpg","shortDescription":"President & Chief Executive Officer, Arizona Community Foundation","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n
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Steven G. Seleznow is President & Chief Executive Officer of the Arizona Community Foundation, a statewide philanthropy whose mission is to lead, serve and collaborate to mobilize enduring philanthropy for a better Arizona. Founded in 1978, ACF has more than 1,700 funds, a network of six affiliated foundations throughout the state, more than $922,000,000 in charitable assets under management today, is Arizona’s largest statewide grant maker, largest private provider of scholarships to students, and among the nation’s largest 25 community foundations. Headquartered in Phoenix, the ACF has made more than $650,000,000 in charitable grants throughout Arizona, across the United States, and internationally.

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Prior to leading the Arizona Community Foundation, Seleznow served for nearly five years as program director and deputy director for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s U.S. Program in Education, managing the implementation of a $2.5 billion investment portfolio and leading grant making for states, districts and networks throughout the country. He previously served as partner and Chief Investment Officer at Venture Philanthropy Partners in Washington, DC.

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Seleznow earned a doctorate and master’s degree in administration, planning, and social policy from Harvard University, a Master of Arts degree from the University of Maryland, and is a magna cum laude graduate of Boston University.

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\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"We are continually amazed by the innovative approaches and ideas that come to light through the New Arizona Prize challenges, and we know that the Water Public Art Challenge will be no exception.\"","quote":"“We are continually amazed by the innovative approaches and ideas that come to light through the New Arizona Prize challenges, and we know that the Water Public Art Challenge will be no exception. In this latest challenge, local artists and art organizations will have an opportunity to share their creative power with our community in a way that shows respect for our region’s cultural history and the continuing need to properly steward our water resources.”","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""},{"id":3,"name":"Andrea Whitsett","firstName":"Andrea","lastName":"Whitsett","title":"","type":"Selection Committee","cms":"judges_g3","image":"image/judges/whitsett_andrea.jpg","thumbnail":"image/judges/whitsett_andrea.jpg","shortDescription":"Director, Morrison Institute of Public Policy at Arizona State University","longDescription":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Andrea Whitsett is Director at Morrison Institute for Public Policy, an applied research institute at Arizona State University. Previously, Whitsett has held a variety of positions within the Institute including associate director, senior research analyst, and special projects manager. During her tenure, Whitsett has guided the publication of numerous policy briefs as well as the Arizona Directions statewide report card. She has led the Institute’s signature State of Our State Conference and helped launch the pilot Arizona Citizens’ Initiative Review. Whitsett frequently presents key research findings to business executives, nonprofit leaders, and academics and has been interviewed by Horizon, KJZZ, Univision, Phoenix Business Journal, and Arizona Week.

Whitsett’s passion for service traces back to her grandmother, Julieta Saucedo Bencomo, a community activist who in 1979 became the first Latina to serve on the Arizona State Board of Education. Whitsett is a member of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s DATOS Research Committee and has co-edited multiple background reports for Arizona Town Hall. Whitsett previously served on the board of directors for the Arizona Center for Afterschool Excellence and as board secretary for Florence Crittenton.

Whitsett holds a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies from Yale University where she was awarded an Amy Rossborough Fellowship through the Yale Women’s Center. Whitsett graduated from Arizona State University with a Master’s degree in Nonprofit Studies and has taught as a faculty associate in ASU’s School of Community Resources and Development.

\n\n\t\n","shortQuote":"\"The New Arizona Prize showcases the quality of inventive thinking that can be stimulated and shared for the collective good when philanthropy, research and journalism join forces. Through this collaboration, cross-sector perspectives shape the Prize design in ways that maximize competition and boldness.\"","quote":"\"The New Arizona Prize showcases the quality of inventive thinking that can be stimulated and shared for the collective good when philanthropy, research and journalism join forces. Through this collaboration, cross-sector perspectives shape the Prize design in ways that maximize competition and boldness. The trifecta of research, resources and media has proven highly effective in the first two iterations of the New Arizona Prize and we’re excited to see the result of the Water Public Art Challenge.\"","location":"","longitude":"","latitude":""}]